Blog about having premature ovarian failure and trying donor IVF with my sister's eggs

Apparently anxiety is a symptom of depression. I’ve been anxious for years now and my doctor says it’s possible I could have benefitted from antidepressants a long time ago.

First I was anxious and upset about having premature ovarian failure which I was diagnosed with about six years back with no follow up support or counselling.

Then I was anxious due to the biological effect of my premature ovarian failure ie: not having any oestrogen actually made me anxious and gave me insomnia. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) helped alleviate some of this but only after about three years of living on my nerves without it.

Then, my husband and I moved from the UK to a new country  (Australia) without jobs and minimal social connections. We made our way on our own but it was tough going while trying to come to terms with premature ovarian failure and the ensuing infertility. It was our own doing but sometimes I think you bite off more than you can chew!

Then we tried IVF as a doctor believed he could get my ovaries working. When nothing happened it was devastating and very anxiety inducing. Once again that doctor offered no follow up counselling or support.

We began working through our infertility and accepted we would be childless until three of my beautiful friends came forward to offer us their eggs. While this was amazing, it was still a very anxious time trying to work out how and whether to proceed with these kind, kind offers.

Then my darling sister offered and we decided to move forward and try. But that whole process was also very stressful as I wanted to give her room to back out at any time and the thought of that happening was terrifying. Then I felt anxious putting her through the physical ordeal of egg donation, as well as splitting her family while she travelled from NZ to Australia to undergo the treatment.

Getting pregnant the first time as a result of her donation was massively exciting but also very nerve-wracking. When that pregnancy ended in miscarriage we were devastated. But somehow we got back on the horse and tried a second embryo transfer with no luck, before I fell pregnant again on our third attempt with our beautiful daughter.

All through the pregnancy we lived on tenterhooks. Would I miscarry like I did the first time? What if the baby had something wrong with it? When I began bleeding early on it was horrendously anxiety invoking but luckily that stopped and we now have our gorgeous girl.

All the while I was working in a job with a psycho boss who demanded far more than I could deliver and played with my emotions in ways that disgust me when I think back to it.

So anxiety has been my constant companion for a long time and is it any wonder that everything just mounted up and landed me in a big heap now?

The great thing is that I’m finally getting treatment for a depression that may have been lurking for a long time as a result of our trials – and hopefully anxiety will be a toxic shadow I can discard forever.

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Comments on: "Anxiety and postnatal depression" (7)

  1. Yes anxiety is the companion to depresion. I still have anxiety attacks but, unlike before I dont panick when I have one. I try to stand back and I ask myself ” OK so whats triggered this off, why am I so axious? I normaly can pin point the trigger and work out why it is makeing me so axious and teach myself new methods to cope with the situation. Haveing a husband who is prepared to learn about depresion makes the biggest difference and is always ready to reach out and grab me before I fall so, I can hang onto him untill I can get back up again. He also looks at what is makeing me anxious and is always prepared to weather the storm.

    • Hi Heather

      I didn’t realise until I came in here that the two were so closely related. I’m sorry to hear you still have panic attacks as they are no fun but it sounds like you have learned to rationalise why you are having them and to manage them. I’ve yet to learn that but am wanting to learn some tricks – I think I’ll be getting a bit of CBT to manage anxiety and attacks better.

      Hallelujah for fantastic husbands! One of the nurses here said to me that all the women she has looked after with PND have had lovely husbands, so maybe we unconsciously seek out kind soft husbands if we are a bit inclined to be on the depressed side??

  2. Sounds like your treatment is long overdue but now you have someone recognising what you are going / have gone through things should start looking up. It is a tough old world out there!

  3. Wow your story sounds identical to mine! Dx in 1985. There was no literature about POF. Drs treated me like a 50 year old women. I was 25! Was very upset, put me on hormones, then the pill. My psychological health was shot. Depression, anxiety big time, I became a bit agoraphobic and other anxiety induced phobias started ie: elevators, flying, traveling distances , it got really debilitating. Finally found help and went on Antidepressant after 12 years of living like that. Got way better but still have residual, learned reactions to situations which use to cause panic now I know how to handle them yet still uncomfotanle.

    • Hi Pam
      That sounds awful! But it’s good to hear you finally got some help and medication – but how terrible that it took 12 years! That’s rubbish! So sorry to hear that but hope you are doing much better these days

  4. Sorry you had to deal with all of this! How are you NOW? Any improvements? I went thru a similar situation and used magnetic therapy to treat the depression. It worked so it might for you too!

    • Hi Jen
      Thanks or your message and sorry for my slow reply. What’s magnetic therapy? The only thing that’s worked for me (and very well) are antidepressants and therapy. Did you try that too?
      I’m interested to hear more…

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